The Destruction of Symbolic Coherency in Jon Rafman and Daniel Lopatin’s Still Life (Betamale)

This video with visuals by Jon Rafman and music by Oneohtrix Point Never (the pseudonym of electronic music pioneer Daniel Lopatin) premiered in 2013, leading up to the release of Oneohtrix Point Never’s album R Plus Seven on Warp Records.

Throughout Still Life (Betamale)virtual environments are juxtaposed with digital counterparts, at once displaying the pristine space of a pixelated computer room representation, and the real-world, physical spaces in which the consumers of the former images interact with the virtual world. Though the virtual environments are displayed as idyllic representations, the real-world environments consist of clutter and decay; dozens of rooms filled to the brim with empty beer cans, cigarette butts littered across keyboards, themselves infested with mold and detritus. This dichotomy suggests a reality wherein immersed users of digital environments increasingly devalue the physical realm as a utility, constructing their virtual environments ad infinitum in its place. And why wouldn’t they?

“You see the things that were inside you. This is the womb,” a digitized voice insists. “You do not move your eyes from the screen. You have become invisible.”

There is a great comfort in interacting with stimulus that seems tailored to satisfy one’s every need, one’s every fantasy. In this world, the reductive constraints of one’s physicality have no influence, minimizing the burden of rejection management. Physicality in itself works as an antithesis to idealism, and its absence allows one to transcend one’s inherent shortcomings. One is able to manufacture a calculated construction of identity by avoiding the trappings of physicality, incentivising users to shift their essential self-identification from physicality to virtuality. The virtual world therefore becomes more real than reality, giving users a hyperreal relationship with those virtual environments that stand in for the absent utility of physical spaces.

At 3:00, a digital rendering of an anime character on a bus is shown. She spreads her legs, presumably due to the creator’s intention of evoking feelings of sexual satisfaction in the viewer. Here, the symbols are the stylized human on the bus, and the digitized bus environment in itself, at once standing in for the existence of a real woman, the placement of a woman on a real bus, and the existence of some bus environment. However, the virtuality of the anime woman, as opposed to the tangibility of a real body in the real world, works to transcend the reality of a woman through idealistic aesthetics. This is a relatively linear process of symbolic communication. Following this imagery, Rafman juxtaposes the previous scene with a video of a real woman in a real changing-room environment, dancing with a mask on meant to look like an anime character, presumably to evoke feelings of sexual satisfaction in the viewer. Here, there are codes operating on various levels, resulting in symbolic indeterminacy. At one level, the real woman dancing is a real event that took place, and the evocation of sexual satisfaction derives from an event in the real, eschewing the transcendent qualities of unreal aesthetics. At another level, the anime mask references a mode of representation meant to transcend reality through idealism, paradoxically coexisting with the real world evocations of the human body in the video. On a third level, the human body itself is not inexorably grounded in the real, as it is a representation facilitated by a video camera, and you, the viewer are necessarily interacting with the imagery on a virtual platform of your own, within the context of a video that is sending its own holistic messaging that is itself detached from any of its single components. This results in a complex and incompatible series of symbolic matrixes. As the symbolic communication of this shot is much less linear than that of the previous shot, their juxtaposition works to denote the manner in which content in virtual environments, through its abundant manufacturing and consumption, disassembles barriers between the symbolic transactions of the virtual and real world.

In these digital environments, symbols are distributed in an indeterminate, omnidirectional motion consisting of interconnected matrixes, resulting in a deconstruction of the formal properties of objects and senders. The consequence of this can be seen in this following section of the piece: a dizzying barrage of fetish erotica constantly appear and dissolve into the next erotic image, never laying stagnant or allowing for orientation. The net result is a completely demolished symbolic coherency, breaking all semblance of codes and symbols. The overflowing content becomes a meaningless representation of itself, a malfunctioning machine, bringing the construction of a distinct reality down with it.

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